Making America sane again

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In the three-plus weeks since the election I have had some 20 or 30 conversations with other Trump voters, some in person, some by phone, all of them out of earshot of our sensitive Democratic friends.

Although my evidence is entirely anecdotal, my sample has been diverse enough for me to feel confident in rejecting the consensus of the chattering classes on the reasons behind Donald Trump’s surprise victory.

It was not about the economy, not really about bringing back jobs, not about reviving forgotten parts of the country. It was about restoring sanity.

Trump’s public message was make America great again. The quiet message was make America sane again.

Person after person with whom I have spoken, young or old, marginal or affluent, have almost immediately spoken of the relief they felt in having the weight of political correctness lifted from their shoulders.

They feared, as did I, that a Clinton victory would fully institutionalize the insanity of the PC regime. Its henchmen – no, not henchpeople, henchmen – would feel free to move beyond shaming to suing, fining, even imprisoning.

They identified the major media as the vehicle through which the progressive elite established and enforced its forever changing norms, and they despised the media for their complicity.

Even those Republicans who could not bring themselves to vote for Trump felt an immediate relief at seeing the elite humbled and their media enforcers disgraced.

Even with Trump elected, the insanity will not disappear. But cut off from the power to enforce their madness, progressives will seem more irrelevant and even more absurd.

On the occasion of the Ohio State mini-jihad, would-be vice president Tim Kaine showed just how silly and self-righteous their whole program is.

“Deeply saddened by the senseless act of gun violence at Ohio State this morning. Praying for the injured and the entire Buckeye community,” Kaine tweeted.

The gratuitous insertion of the word “gun” suggests that Kaine was not saddened at all. No, he saw this as an opportunity to make the left’s otherwise illogical case for gun control.

Reality, however, triumphed here over illusion. The attacker was not the longed-for deranged tea party activist but the increasingly routine young Muslim jihadist, wielding, in this case, a car and a knife.

In Canada, PC illusion triumphed momentarily over reality when young Justin Trudeau penned his already notorious paean to the late Fidel Castro.

“Fidel Castro was a larger than life leader who served his people for almost half a century,” wrote the Canadian prime minister.

“While a controversial figure, both Mr. Castro’s supporters and detractors recognized his tremendous dedication and love for the Cuban people who had a deep and lasting affection for ‘el Comandante.’”

So deeply immersed has Trudeau been in his PC bubble, he likely had no sense of the absurdity of his comments.

Ordinary Canadians and Americans did. The hashtag #trudeaueulogy immediately sprang into life with well-deserved parodies like, “Today we mourn painter and animal rights activist, Adolph Hitler.”

The straight talking was no longer limited to social media. “Today marks the passing of a brutal dictator who oppressed his own people for nearly six decades,” tweeted Donald Trump.

He continued, “Fidel Castro’s legacy is one of firing squads, theft, unimaginable suffering, poverty and the denial of fundamental human rights.”

Yes, of course, that is his legacy in real world, outside the bubble. How refreshing it was for someone to actually say the obvious.

A week before Trump announced his candidacy, I wrote in this column, “The Republican nominee for president will be that candidate who best learns that there is no future in apologizing.”

The only way to beat the left,” I added, “is to stand your ground, to not apologize for yourself or for your political allies, even those less verbally adroit.”

Donald Trump intuited his way to a winning strategy. It had something to do with economics, but it had a lot to do with common sense.

Order Jack Cashill’s latest groundbreaking book, “TWA 800: The Crash, the Cover-up and the Conspiracy”

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