FBI CANNOT confirm that hate letters sent to mosques came from outside Muslim community

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It is embarrassing, yet painfully amusing, to watch law enforcement twist and turn in order to dance around the facts when it comes to these bogus islamofauxbia cases. Faked hate “crimes” are part of a pattern perpetrated by the Muslim community themselves. It’s irrelevant that eventually it comes out that it was a Muslim that wrote the letter or vandalized the mosque, etc. The objective is get it on the front pages of the major enemedia news outlets (who, like the lapdogs they are, obediently print these bogus stories unchallenged). By the time the truth is exposed about these hoaxes, the enemedia swarm has moved on and perhaps they’ll run an update about the Muslim perps weeks later. Unlikely, though.

As one reader pointed out, “It is obviously a forgery written by a Muslim. The dead giveaway is in the sentence: “your fathers are dogs.” No right-winger hurls the insult “sons of dogs.” Calling someone a “dog” is, however, quite common among Muslims.” The kuffar are sons of dogs.

FBI can’t confirm that hate letters sent to mosques actually came from outside Muslim community

By Robert Spencer, November 30, 2016:

“The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) could not, however, confirm that the letters actually came from outside the community, or that they were not a prank.”

As I explained here, there is plenty of reason to doubt that these letters are genuine. They are much more likely to be part of Muslim groups’ in the U.S. never-ending quest for protected victim status.

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“FBI, LAPD Cannot Confirm Anti-Muslim Letters as ‘Hate Crime,’” by Joel B. Pollak, Breitbart, November 28, 2016:

LOS ANGELES — Law enforcement officials gathered with local Muslim leaders at the Islamic Center of Southern California to respond to threatening letters that had been sent to several mosques in the state.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) could not, however, confirm that the letters actually came from outside the community, or that they were not a prank. And the Los Angeles Police Department said that the letters were being investigated as a “hate incident,” not a “hate crime,” because there was no specific, immediate threat.

Stephen Woolery, FBI Special Agent in Charge of the Counterterrorism Division in Los Angeles, said that at least five letters were received by Islamic institutions in California. Letters were received in San Jose, Northridge, Claremont, Signal Hill, and Los Angeles. He added that there was possibly one more letter that had been received outside the state, possibly in Georgia.

One letter, widely circulated in the media, read, in part: “You Muslims are a vile and filthy people … There’s a new sheriff in town — President Donald Trump. He’s going to cleanse America … He’s going to do to you Muslims what Hitler did to the Jews.”

The language of each of the letters was similar, officials said. They did not contain a specific threat of violence….

Local Muslim leaders at the press conference, which involved both local and international media, invited the author or authors of the letter to have a frank discussion about faith. “We want this to be out in the open, in broad daylight. Bullies feel emboldened in dark alleys.

Dr. Sayed Moustafa al-Qazwini, the president of the Shia Muslim Council of Southern California, said: “We stand against hate crime and against terrorism.” He advised members of the community to go about their normal activities.

Another Muslim leader responded to a suspected terror attack earlier in the day at Ohio State, where several people were injured in an attack, apparently carried out by a Muslim immigrant from Somalia, involving a car and knives.

“The problem comes when we politicize one incident over others … when the reality is, it’s just violence,” he said….

In other words, ignore the motivating ideology behind jihad terror attacks.

[Woolery] said that the FBI had wanted to participate in the press conference, despite the lack of an investigation, “to be visible, strong partners with our community. Our role is to monitor the situation … making sure there is no threat.”

“It was important for us to be here to demonstrate that partnership, because I think that’s important to the community.”

H/T Pamela Geller
by Pamela Geller ||Image Credit

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